Peacemaking Literacy

Developing a Literacy Toolbox Toward Acts of Healing

Query: How might we engage in truth-telling, concomitant with a healing process?

Language for healing calls for shared understanding. The following definitions are offered for our growing edges, as we consider what might be missing.

Paula Palmer and Jim Murphy, researching the Quaker Collection of Swarthmore College, 2015.

(c) 2017 S. Boone Murphy ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

apology – def.: a regretful acknowledgement of an offense or failure;

redemption – def.: action of saving or being saved from sin, error;

forgiveness – def.: an action or process of forgiving or being forgiven.

gratitude – def.: feeling pleased by what someone did and also pleased by the results; Latin – gratus, thankful/ pleasing.

revelation – def.: divine disclosure to humans of something relating to human existence or the world.


The question of a meaningful apology is reflected in its accountability for behaviour that accentuates historical trauma, where people are suffering from what has been unspoken, “invisible.” Both, apologies and forgiveness recognize truths which may be the source of deep psychological, spiritual, ecological and economic impacts on our humanity.



Tara Houska discusses the R-Word and Historical Trauma

 


Elicia G. Winner of Multicultural Award Promotes Healing Through Sharing Stories

Elicia Goodsoldier encourages people to share their stories to heal.

The 32-year-old Dine’ and Spirit Lake Dakota woman speaks openly about the conflicted emotions she experienced during her youth, raised in her grandparents’ blended Christian and American Indian home on the Navajo Indian Reservation in Lupton, Arizona, reported the Longmont Times-Call. As children, both of her grandparents were committed to boarding schools, where sexual and physical abuse was rampant. They were forbidden to practice their Native American traditions and forced to adopt Christianity. “When they grew up, being Indian was a bad thing, speaking your language was a bad thing,” Goodsoldier said. “You needed to speak English and become a Christian.” In turn, Goodsoldier became a victim of historical trauma, which “is passed on across generations, if there is no spiritual intervention,” she wrote on the One Action website. (One Action is a Boulder County, Colorado-based community conversation project dedicated to promoting understanding and acceptance of historical truths.) Goodsoldier told the Longmont Times-Call how feeling disconnected with her roots and a constant fear of abandonment led her to attempt suicide twice. “I wish when I was 16 years old or 22 years old, I had someone like me who was helping me. I feel like when you’re ashamed of what you’ve been through and you hold it in and you don’t let it go, how do you heal?” she told the local newspaper.

Goodsoldier is healing her wounds and stopping the cycle of historical trauma by reconnecting to her culture and teaching her three children to speak Lakota. The family regularly participates in sweat lodge ceremonies and other traditional rituals. Goodsoldier is one of the winners of this year’s Boulder County Multicultural Awards, which recognizes the accomplishments and community contributions of people of color. Honorees will be recognized at a banquet ceremony at the Plaza Hotel in Longmont, Colorado on October 4. Goodsoldier now works as a vocational rehabilitation counselor with the Chinook Clubhousein Boulder, Colorado, a Mental Health Partners of Boulder County program where she helps people find temporary and permanent employment. Before that, she worked as a project coordinator for the Sweetgrass Project, the Oglala Sioux Tribe’s Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration-funded tribal youth suicide prevention program. While living in Pine Ridge, she additionally volunteered for several years for the Wakanyeja Pawicayapi, Inc. (“The Children First”), a nonprofit started and operated by Oglala Lakota healers, elders and teachers, for children that have suffered or been victimized in their homes. Among her many other roles in the mental health field, Goodsoldier serves as the board chairwoman for National Alliance for Mental Illness of Boulder County and is a commissioner on the Denver American Indian Commission. “She’s a woman of action,” said Toni Moon, the director of wellness, education and employment at Mental Health Partners, and one of three people who nominated Goodsoldier for a Boulder County Multicultural Award.


Seek and Ye Shall Find: American Indians in children’s literature.


Query: How might accountability & revelation be complimentary; incompatible?

(Re)Making History:

The Real Story Is Bigger and Better  | Kevin Gover

Americans have been taught a shallow and simple narrative of the history of Native Americans and the history of our country. Shallow narratives are satisfying and allow us to feel good about our history as a nation, but they can cause our approach to contemporary issues to be uninformed and even misinformed. Kevin discusses fearlessly embracing the larger, messier, more complex truths of our history. Kevin Americans have been taught a shallow and simple narrative of the history of Native Americans and the history of our country. Shallow narratives are satisfying and allow us to feel good about our history as a nation, but they can cause our approach to contemporary issues to be uninformed and even misinformed. Kevin discusses fearlessly embracing the larger, messier, more complex truths of our history.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.

Kevin Gover is the director of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) and a citizen of the Pawnee Tribe of Oklahoma. Gover was nominated by President Clinton to serve as the Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs in the United States Department of the Interior. His tenure as Assistant Secretary is perhaps best-known for his apology to Native American people for the historical conduct of the Bureau of Indian Affairs.


Decolonization and spirituality are inextricably linked. ~George J Sefa Dei

UN DRIP 10th Anniversary

To the UN General Assembly

YouTube posted by Tupac Enrique Acosta, April 28, 2017

Oren Lyons, Faithkeeper, Turtle Clan, Onondaga Nation, Haudenosaunee


Address to the United Nations General Assembly as the appointed speaker for the North American socio-cultural region at the UN General Assembly high level meeting marking the 10th anniversary of the passage of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP). During the Sixteenth Session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII), UN Headquarters, New York, April 25, 2017.


Mr. President, Distinguished Members of the United Nations, Distinguished Leaders and Representatives of Indigenous Nations and Peoples, nya wenha ska nonh (thank you for being well.)  Ska nonh is our word for peace, and it is the same word for health.  I greet you on behalf of the Indigenous Peoples of the Great Turtle Island – North America.

2017 marks my 40th year of attendance in the great halls of the United Nations, both in Geneva and New York, representing the interests and issues of our peoples and the natural world.  Understanding that our tenure as the human species on this earth is completely and totally dependent upon the resources of Mother Earth.  Not the least of which is water.  Our mandate is inclusive of all life, the welfare of future generations and the common good. I remind you as we did in the year 2000, and again in the year 2014, that the ice continues to melt in the north.  We squandered time.

The ice of course, has its own leader. And it is ultimately our leader as well. We have learned over these fifty years of interaction in these great halls about the importance of terminology. We have had to learn the very special terminology of the United Nations.  Territorial integrity is one of those terminologies that reflects the confines of States. It establishes boundaries, and also ideas. I remind you again that the territorial integrity of Mother Earth binds all of us, in a much larger context.
The laws of that territorial integrity are absolute. There is no habeas corpus, there is no court, there is only the law. You abide, or suffer the consequences.  And the consequences of that is, our human species have brought us to a point where there is a question of our survival as a species on this earth.  More than a question: serious observations, dependence on discussions in these great halls. Peace is possible. Peace is here. It has always been here. Peace is within the mandates of these halls, to exercise it.

To best serve the interest of the Indigenous Peoples of North America in this short time, I must express to you our consternation, that on the 10th anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, we are presented with “enhanced participation” purporting to “enable our participation and meetings with the UN bodies,” but the proposed procedures seem to violate most of the articles of the Declaration.  In particular, our rights to self-determination; free, prior, and informed consent; consultation; and many more.

After forty years of discussion, it seems to me that we should move on. I would say that in this short time probably the most important thing we could do is move the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples to a United Nations Convention.  Let’s get on with it.

And so with that, on behalf of Turtle Island, North America – Nya wenha (I thank you). Ska nonh (peace). It is in this room. It’s up to you. Dah ney’ to (Now I am finished).