Introducing PYM Quakers

Can You Identify the Quaker?

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Click here for the answer. You may be surprised!

We’re all Quakers !

We are all seekers, sharing our spiritual journeys with one another. Our faith includes people who identify themselves as Christians as well as many who identify more closely with universalist identity. Our members come from all walks of life and religious traditions. What we have in common is our desire to discover our spiritual nature, share it with one another and act on it in our daily lives.

We are a faith community

Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends is a community of faith based on experience of a transforming power named many ways: the Inner Light, the Spirit of Christ, the Guide, the Living God, the Divine Presence.

We worship together

Philadelphia Yearly Meeting Quakers celebrate unprogrammed worship. We emphasize the authority of the Divine Inward Light as revealed to us through patient discernment of the divine Spirit in corporate worship.

We witness to the world

Our faith and spiritual discernment have been wellsprings for centuries of service to those in need and who hunger for freedom and justice.

Visit a Friends Meeting

Quaker meetings offer a place where people can find a real sense of community and are free to explore their own spiritual beliefs, values and ideas in community with other seekers.

A Compact History of our Faith

The Religious Society of Friends arose during the mid-1600’s in England. George Fox and Margaret Fell, among others, were Seekers of Truth attempting to recover the spirit of early Christianity. They founded the Religious Society of Friends, or Quakers. Philadelphia Yearly Meeting has been in continuous existence in North America since the early 1700’s.

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Early Quakers believed that the Inner Light in each person provides direct access to God without intermediaries or literal readings of Scripture. Waiting in expectant silence, early Friends were inspired by that still, small voice of God to minister to each other and to work for justice, equality and peace. The movement spread to many other countries, including the United States, where Quaker William Penn founded the Pennsylvania colony. The rest was history. And even though Quaker membership is small compared to mainstream Protestant churches, Quaker influence is felt every day in all walks of life both in the United States and worldwide.